Health News

Shoveling Snow: The Good and the Bad

Shoveling snow can be a functional way of clearing a path and an excellent chance to get some outdoor exercise during the cold winter season. On the other hand, it can be a potential health risk. Knowing a few crucial details can go a long way toward staying happy and healthy this snowy season.

1.  Proper Body Position: Like most activities, the way in which you use your body can be either help or hurt.

  • Give your back a break and use your legs and hips to do the work.
  • Avoid twisting, turn entire body to dump the snow
  • Keep shovel handle in near stomach not way out to the side

                             Good                                                                                      Bad

Proper-Snow-Shoveling1Unproper-Snow-Shoveling http://www.abhayawellness.com/

2.  Don’t Over Do It: Most have heard of someone having a heart attack while shoveling. This is a big concern but not the only one. Beware of muscle strains, tearing knee meniscus or ligaments, Shoulder injuries, and overheating (to name a few).  Listen to your body.

  • Take it slow
  • Take breaks
  • Do not over load the shovel
  • If it is too much or too deep don’t be afraid to ask for help!

3. Dress Appropriately: Wearing layers can help to stay at the correct temperature. If you are sweating, shed a few items. If you do not dress warm enough than go back inside and either put more on or warm up for a bit.

4. Stay Hydrated…that means water: Even if you do not feel like you are sweating it is important to stay well hydrated. Doing so before and after shoveling will help.

5. Use the Correct Equipment: Using the correct tool for the job can make the job a lot easier. So can wearing the correct footwear. A boot with good traction (or a traction slip on) can make the job a lot safer and easier.

Print  ice grips sears

http://www.consumerreports.org                                                        http://www.sears.com

And the same rules apply for Snow Blowing!

Simpliest and Best Way to Stay Healthy and Avoid the Flu!

Hand-washing: Do’s and don’ts

Hand-washing is an easy way to prevent infection. Understand when to wash your hands, how to properly use hand sanitizer and how to get your children into the habit.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Frequent hand-washing is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick and spreading illness. Hand-washing requires only soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer — a cleanser that doesn’t require water.

Find out when and how to wash your hands properly.

When to wash your handshandwash

As you touch people, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands. In turn, you can infect yourself with these germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Although it’s impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes.

Always wash your hands before:

  • Preparing food or eating
  • Treating wounds, giving medicine, or caring for a sick or injured person
  • Inserting or removing contact lenses

Always wash your hands after:

  • Preparing food, especially raw meat or poultry
  • Using the toilet or changing a diaper
  • Touching an animal or animal toys, leashes or waste
  • Blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing into your hands
  • Treating wounds or caring for a sick or injured person
  • Handling garbage, household or garden chemicals, or anything that could be contaminated — such as a cleaning cloth or soiled shoes
  • Shaking hands with others

In addition, wash your hands whenever they look dirty.

How to wash your hands

It’s generally best to wash your hands with soap and water. Follow these simple steps:

  • Wet your hands with running water — either warm or cold.
  • Apply liquid, bar or powder soap.
  • Lather well.
  • Rub your hands vigorously for at least 20 seconds. Remember to scrub all surfaces, including the backs of your hands, wrists, between your fingers and under your fingernails.
  • Rinse well.
  • Dry your hands with a clean or disposable towel or air dryer.
  • If possible, use a towel or your elbow to turn off the faucet.

Keep in mind that antibacterial soap is no more effective at killing germs than is regular soap. Using antibacterial soap might even lead to the development of bacteria that are resistant to the product’s antimicrobial agents — making it harder to kill these germs in the future

 

How to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer

Alcohol-based hand sanitizers, which don’t require water, are an acceptable alternative when soap and water aren’t available. If you use a hand sanitizer, make sure the product contains at least 60 percent alcohol. Then follow these simple steps:

  • Apply enough of the product to the palm of your hand to wet your hands completely.
  • Rub your hands together, covering all surfaces, until your hands are dry.

Antimicrobial wipes or towelettes are another effective option. Again, look for a product that contains a high percentage of alcohol. If your hands are visibly dirty, however, wash with soap and water.

Kids need clean hands, too

Help children stay healthy by encouraging them to wash their hands properly and frequently. Wash your hands with your child to show him or her how it’s done. To prevent rushing, suggest washing hands for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice. If your child can’t reach the sink on his or her own, keep a step stool handy.

Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are OK for children and adolescents, especially when soap and water aren’t available. However, be sure to supervise young children using alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Remind your child to make sure the sanitizer completely dries before he or she touches anything. Store the container safely away after use.

Hand hygiene is especially important for children in child care settings. Young children cared for in groups outside the home are at greater risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, which can easily spread to family members and other contacts.

Be sure your child care provider promotes frequent hand-washing or use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Ask whether the children are required to wash their hands several times a day — not just before meals. Note, too, whether diapering areas are cleaned after each use and whether eating and diapering areas are well-separated.

A simple way to stay healthy

Hand-washing doesn’t take much time or effort, but it offers great rewards in terms of preventing illness. Adopting this simple habit can play a major role in protecting your health.

 

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/in-depth/hand-washing/art-20046253?pg=1

Avoid the Halloween sugar overload and consider the Switch Witch instead!!

In my household Halloween is the biggest non-religious holiday of the year. We all love fall, pumpkins, the lights and freights, and of course feverously trying to finish the homemade costumes in the last few days (no store bought ones allowed here!). However, with all of this fun comes the problem of all the candy.

We do not allow our kids to eat Candy or other junk food (they are 3 and 4 what do they really NEED it for). After some arguing my wife convinced me to let them go trick or treating (I felt they were too young especially since they do not eat the candy and she felt I was ruing their childhood). So, like a large growing group of parents, we decided to do a form of the “Switch Witch.”

  Featured image

Don’t know what the Switch Witch is? (Also sometimes called the Halloween Fairy, Great Pumpkin, or Candy Fairy.) This is a great way to join in the festivities of Halloween without the mass sugar load. As you might guess the kids can trade in their candy in exchange for a gift. This was an excellent option in our house. The kids were very excited to get that new movie (Hotel Transylvania) instead of the candy they did not want.

The switching of candy can be done in many ways. Some leave it in a Halloween bowl or witch’s caldron and the fairy exchanges it at night. Others allow the kids to pick the item. If you allow your kids to eat the candy, they can choose a few pieces they like the most and trade the rest, with the more candy traded the better the gift.

The traded candy can then be given away, repurposed in many a Pinterest project, or you and the kids can do experiments on it. Experimenting on candy may seem strange but believe me it can be a lot of fun and the kids love it (and learn). There a few sources for the experiments below:

http://www.babble.com/home/science-over-sugar-halloween-candy-experiments-for-kids/

http://kidshealth.org/kid/closet/experiments/experiments_candy.html

http://www.science20.com/science_motherhood/top_10_scientific_uses_leftover_halloween_candy

So avoid the Cavity creating, hyperactive, blood sugar spiking chow down and find your own unique way to celebrate Halloween by trying the Switch Witch in your house!

http://www.switch-witch.com

Candy can also be donated to places like Ronald McDonald House and Operation Shoebox and Candy Buy Back.

Chiropractors… More Than Just Back Doctors: Part 1 – The “TMJ”

Chiropractors, More Than Just Back Doctors
Part 1- The “TMJ”

Did you know that Chiropractors can be the best course of treatment for treatment other the spine? Many people are facing jaw pain, clicking, and possibly limited mouth opening.

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is located one fingertip-width in front of the auditory meatus, the external opening for the ear. Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a common condition arising from one or more of numerous factors, including but not limited to tooth position (orthodontic), muscular tone and harmony, trigger point referrals, cranial compression, damaged or misaligned articular disc, or other intracapsular disorders, such as arthritis or infection and injury by blow. There are many other suspected contributing factors, such as emotional well-being and stress, mineral and hormonal imbalances, nutritional factors, allergies and chemical exposures.
Continue reading “Chiropractors… More Than Just Back Doctors: Part 1 – The “TMJ””

Now that the ALS ice bucket challenge has slowed down here is an interesting look at the disease’s 1st fame.

lou gherig

The Yankees’ Lou Gehrig was helped off the field after being struck in the head by a fastball from pitcher Ray White of the Norfolk Tars in a June 1934 exhibition game. The ball caught Gehrig above the right eye, knocking him unconscious.

THE NEW YORK TIMES

August 17, 2010

Study Says Brain Trauma Can Mimic A.L.S.

By ALAN SCHWARZ

In the 71 years since the Yankees slugger Lou Gehrig declared himself “the luckiest man on the face of the earth,” despite dying from a disease that would soon bear his name, he has stood as America’s leading icon of athletic valor struck down by random, inexplicable fate.

A peer-reviewed paper to be published Wednesday in a leading journal of neuropathology, however, suggests that the demise of athletes like Gehrig and soldiers given a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, might have been catalyzed by injuries only now becoming understood: concussions and other brain trauma.

Continue reading “Now that the ALS ice bucket challenge has slowed down here is an interesting look at the disease’s 1st fame.”

Back (Pack) to School: Choose the Right Backpack

Back (Pack) to School: Choose the Right Backpack

back packs

There is usually a great deal of difference between the backpack that your child and your doctor would pick out. Don’t just choose the backpack that is the “coolest” it may also be the worst. Make sure that the backpack has the option for two shoulder carrying and that the straps are wide enough not to cut into the shoulders, has moderate padding in the back, and fits the child…that’s right not all packs fit all. Continue reading “Back (Pack) to School: Choose the Right Backpack”

More technology can mean more pain: Using your devices the right way.

More technology can mean more pain: Using your devices the right way.

Most likely as some point I have yelled at you about holding the phone to your ear with you shoulder. Well, here is someone else stressing that point… and more!

 http://www.technohealthy.com

 Using Technology Safely

Mobile technological devices, such as digital personal assistants (PDAs) and smartphones have made our lives more convenient. We can now send e-mails, access the Internet, manage our schedules, and use spreadsheets and other office software from our phones. While this makes it easier to accomplish tasks without being tethered to an office, it has also increased the amount of time we spend using these devices, which is not without risks.

Before these advances in technology, our bodies moved as we used the phone and the computer, we walked to the fax machine, and we flipped through our calendars. Now we slump over a small screen with little change in our position. Our bodies are made to move—not to maintain the same posture for long periods of time. This doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice these modern conveniences for your health, but you should be aware of the risks and what you can do to minimize them. Continue reading “More technology can mean more pain: Using your devices the right way.”

Worst Exercise Machines

An article stating what we have for years: “Worst Exercise Machines” and what to do instead!

Worst Exercise Machines                                                                                                              

Stephen Perrine with Leah Flickinger and the Editors of Women’s Health                                 Tuesday, March 20, 2012                                                                                                       YAHOO.HEALTH

When it comes to working out, exercise machines aren’t always effective–or even safe. Here are the machines to skip next time you hit the gym, plus some alternative exercises to help you train smarter.

Seated Leg Extension Machine

 

 

What it’s supposed to do: Train the quadriceps.

What it actually does: It strengthens a motion your legs aren’t actually designed to do, and can put undue strain on the ligaments and tendons surrounding the kneecaps.

A better exercise: One-Legged Body-Weight Squats

Lift one leg up and bend the opposite knee, dipping as far as you can, with control, while flexing at the hip, knee, and ankle. Use a rail for support until you develop requisite leg strength and balance. Aim for five to 10 reps on each leg. (If you are susceptible to knee pain, do the Bulgarian split squat instead, resting the top of one foot on a bench positioned two to three feet behind you. Descend until your thigh is parallel to the ground and then stand back up. Do five to 10 reps per leg.)

[“The picture above shows a pistol squat which most people cannot perform, keeping the balance leg behind, usually on a box or chair is a more practical way” – Dr. Dusty]

Continue reading “Worst Exercise Machines”

Can you spare 30 mins a week…then lets get moving!

Can you spare 30 mins a week…then lets get moving!

One of the most common reasons people give for not getting in shape is “I just do not have the time.” Somewhere along the line most people have been led to believe they would need to spend hours every day at the gym to get any results. The truth is any additional exercise and any healthy changes to the diet will start improvement their health. It is possible to get life changes results in as little as 30 minutes a week. And I am not talking about a magical video or device. Simple and short exercises and mild dietary changes can increase energy, decrease fat and increase muscle tone.

Below is an excerpt from Canadian Fitness and Nutrition expert John Berardi, PhD “Two Experiments In Exercise Minimalism”. Continue reading “Can you spare 30 mins a week…then lets get moving!”

Former Volleydon using experience to help athletes

Former Volleydon using experience to help athletes

Sherman donates time as chiropractor to IPFW

By Blake Sebring of The News-Sentinel

Dustin Sherman has always had more stubbornness than a gaggle of terrible 2-year-olds. No, not in an obstinate, “I’m never doing that” way, but rather in a never-quit, “I’ll show you” way.

Dr_Dustin_Sherman

Coaches build teams around athletes like that because they can use them as whipping boys to drive teammates to raise intensity or improve. How many times have coaches said, “If only I could take this player’s heart and put it into this athlete’s body” why then they’d have something?

At 5-foot-10 with the wiry body of a stray dog, Sherman never had that something, but he made the most of what he had. He was so tough as an IPFW men’s volleyball player from 2000 to 2004 that he played despite having the mushy back of an 80-year-old man.

Because of a weightlifting accident between his freshman and sophomore year, Sherman had spondylothesis, a slip of one vertebral body on top of another. Along with a stress fracture in his back, there were four bulging disks and degenerative changes, which meant Sherman was not a candidate for surgery as any fusion would have severely limited his movement.

“I refused to give up my life for my injury,” Sherman said. “I will deal with the consequences later, but I’m not going to sit there and complain. I am not just going to quit.”

He should have been sitting in a wheelchair instead of on the bench. Somehow he kept playing, signing waivers to allow him to participate. He did everything he could to strengthen his core muscles and take pressure off his back, but when he couldn’t play, he was virtually an assistant coach, constantly making suggestions to teammates and coach Arnie Ball.

“I remember talking to (team doctor) Eric Jenkinson before my senior year and him saying, ‘I don’t care what you sign, you’re not playing. You’re not going to be able to pick up your kids when you’re 40!’ ” Sherman said. “I was like ‘Who cares about that, I want to play.’ It was stupidity. I did everything I could to hide what was going on.”

One time he dove so hard for a ball in practice that he suffered spinal shock like two football players hitting head-to-head. He couldn’t move from the waist down to roll off the court. He’d lie on an inversion board after every practice, defying doctors, trainers and family members who tried to knock common sense into him.

He was foolish but he loved every second of it, and he’s one of Ball’s favorite players.

“He made himself the player that he was,” Ball said. “He added so much to our practices because of the way he played and his mentality.”

So fast-forward 10 years, and guess what Sherman does for a living? He’s a doctor who helps athletes and others at Aaron Chiropractic. Guess who one of his friends and colleagues is? Jenkinson. What does he do every Tuesday afternoon? He donates his time and care to anyone in the IPFW athletic department. What’s his pet cause? He’s an advocate for athlete training health.

ipfw chiropractor Dustin Sherman
Dustin Sherman works on IPFW volleyball player

But is he any smarter about how he handles his own health?

“I’m probably the strongest core-wise I’ve ever been and the smartest I’ve ever been, but I still do dumb things,” Sherman said. “I was cutting a tree down in my front yard and it landed across my driveway. My wife comes driving up, so I leaned down and grabbed a limb to pull it away. I just dropped.

“I know how to help myself as far as what I need to do to recover. I know the positions so when I do have that lapse of stupidity, I what to do to get through things quickly.”

Now he coaches boys volleyball, serves as the athletic department’s chiropractor and still plays every once in a while, but he says he knows his limits. He uses everything he went through to learn from and help others, and he’s good at it because he’s so diligent and determined. If anything, he’s even more passionate now.

His ultimate goal?

“To put myself out of business. That’s pretty easy, isn’t it?” he said with a laugh. “Why wouldn’t it be? In that dream world if we can get to every single person before they are injured … I would love to work on my hobby car full time or be a chef or do other things that I love to do. I know that’s not realistic, but I can do my part.”

Sure, it’s improbable, but he’s stubborn like that.

bsebring@news-sentinel.com