Health News

The Winter Blues

grief-snowAre you suffering from “The Winter Blues?” This is the sadness or increased tired feeling that can occur when the days are shorter and the sunlight is at a minimum.

The link between sunlight exposure and depression can be linked to a decrease in the neurotransmitter Serotonin. The winter blues, officially known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is characterized by a decrease in energy level, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, irritability, weight gain, and carbohydrate cravings, among other things. These symptoms are worsened by a decrease in fresh air and exercise that accompany the colder weather.

Continue reading “The Winter Blues”

Did you know we have full time massage available.

massage available
Not all massages are created equal…
That is why we have brought the best of the best in to work with us here at Chiropractic Sports Medicine and Empowered Sports Club.
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Call 260-908-6852 or visit thebodyworxco.com to schedule your appt today.
 
 
Locations
 – 12124 Lima Road, Ft. Wayne, IN 46818 (Empowered Sports Club/Chiro Sport location)
 – 100 N. Clark St. Auburn, IN 46706 (their main location)
 – *coming soon* an Angola, IN location
Hours: (by appointment)
 Mon-Fri 8a-10p,
 Sat 7a-8p
 Sun 9a- 9p.
Monday-Friday (at Empowered location) you can set up a massage prior to a Chiropractic adjustment.
Why are they the best.

 – Therapeutic grade, goal-oriented massage therapy with a purpose

– Their skills have allowed them to work with professional, Olympic, college, and high school athletes, National recording artists, kids, expecting mothers.

Meet the Message Therapist.
 
Megan Banks
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Karmen Casey
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Jessica Shifra
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Tina Minet
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Robyn Wright
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​​
​…As always Referrals and Reviews appreciated!

Mastodons Hold “Life After Athletics” Alumni Panel For Student-Athletes

http://gomastodons.com/news/2016/10/25/general-mastodons-hold-life-after-athletics-panel-for-student-athletes.aspx

IPFW Mastodons Athletics

Mastodons Hold “Life After Athletics” Alumni Panel For Student-Athletes

salt-life-after-athletics-djFORT WAYNE, Ind. – The Fort Wayne athletic department held the first “Life After Athletics” alumni panel on Friday (Oct. 21) for current Mastodon junior and senior student-athletes. The luncheon featured four former Fort Wayne student-athletes sharing their stories of how they transitioned from a student-athlete to the professional world.

The panel included Dr. Claire Jackson-Hemphill (women’s volleyball, 2003-07), Dr. Dustin Sherman (men’s volleyball, 2000-04), Cassie Wolfe-Antos (softball, 2009-13) and Alli Hook-Meyer (2008-12). The group touched on multiple topics, including how to convey the skills developed as a Division I student-athlete to potential employers, who they leaned on for support following their playing career, finding an outlet for the need for competition, staying in good health and dealing with success and failure in the professional setting.

Additionally, 25 other Mastodon student-athletes emailed their thoughts on the transition to the professional world. Their experiences were also featured in the presentation.

“Student-athletes, SALT, student-athlete alumni, IPFW Career Services, Dr. Kim McDonald and Alumni Relations all contributed their expertise to help put this event together,” Associate Athletic Director and Senior Woman Administrator Christine Kuznar said. “I thank them for their support.”

The alumni panel luncheon was created with assistance through Kuznar’s participation in the IPFW Leadership Academy.

The Everyday Athlete

Chiropractic “Sports” Medicine, Fort Wayne:  The Everyday Athlete

Slide3I get asked many times a week, “Do you only treat athletes?” My response ultimately is “NO” but my answer is usually a longer version along the lines of “In a way yes because everyone is an athlete.”

The problem is that many view the requirements for athletics to be more rigorous and body mechanics to be more important during sports. Where I do agree that this is extremely important, I will argue that the same NEEDS to be done in everyday life. Continue reading “The Everyday Athlete”

The real-world benefits of strengthening your core

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The real-world benefits of strengthening your core   

Healthbeat

January 24, 2012

http://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-real-world-benefits-of-strengthening-your-core

Think of your core muscles as the sturdy central link in a chain connecting your upper and lower body. Whether you’re hitting a tennis ball or mopping the floor, the necessary motions either originate in your core, or move through it.

No matter where motion starts, it ripples upward and downward to adjoining links of the chain. Thus, weak or inflexible core muscles can impair how well your arms and legs function. And that saps power from many of the moves you make. Properly building up your core cranks up the power. A strong core also enhances balance and stability. Thus, it can help prevent falls and injuries during sports or other activities. In fact, a strong, flexible core underpins almost everything you do: Continue reading “The real-world benefits of strengthening your core”

Concussions

concussion_0131Concussions

Everyday there is more research and information about concussions available to the public. And never before has awareness been higher. It has been the talk of the media with the recent increase in retired NFL players and pro wrestlers committing suicide after dealing with behavioral and emotional changes likely from multiple concussions causing the permanent brain damage called Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). However, it is surprising how many people are unaware of how to determine if someone has a concussion and what steps to take if they do. And we must remember concussions can result from a one time major trauma or repeated mild trauma.

The best place to start is discussion what a concussion really is:

“The brain is made of soft tissue and is cushioned by spinal fluid. It is encased in the hard, protective skull. When a person gets a head injury, the brain can move around inside the skull and even bang against it. This can lead to  bruising of the brain, tearing of blood vessels, and injury to the nerves. When this happens, a person can get a concussion — a temporary loss of normal brain function.”

–      http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/first_aid/concussions.html

There is also a lot of confusion as to the symptoms of a concussion. Many people think there as to be a loss of consciousness but in fact the symptoms are quite varying and range in severity. This list below is from www.STOPSportsInjuries.org.

qhcnluConcussion symptoms include the following:

  • Balance problems
  • Difficulty communicating, concentrating
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling emotional
  • Feeling mentally foggy
  • Headache
  • Irritability
  • Memory difficulties
  • Nausea
  • Nervousness
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Sadness
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Sleeping more than usual or difficulty falling asleep
  • Visual problems – blurry or double vision
  • Vomiting
  • Balance problems
  • Difficulty communicating, concentrating
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling emotional
  • Feeling mentally foggy
  • Headache
  • Irritability

The first steps any coach, family member or friend needs to take when a suspected head trauma has occurred is to remove the injured person from activity. Second, look for any of the signs and symptoms mentioned above (but remember some may take time to present). If any are present the individual should not return to the activity and should seek medical attention. Parent or spouse should be informed of the incident and educated to watch for the signs and symptoms (http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/STOP/STOP/Prevent_Injuries/Concussion.aspx).

As a coach, recording the following information can help health care professionals in assessing the athlete after the injury:

  • Cause of the injury and force of the hit or blow to the head or body
  • Any loss of consciousness (passed out/knocked out) and if so, for how long
  • Any memory loss immediately following the injury
  • Any seizures immediately following the injury
  • Number of previous concussions (if any)

–      http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/sports/response.html

Return to activity or sport should not happen until cleared by a medical professional (in many states this is the law).  When returning to activity the individual should do so slowly.

  1. no activity
  2. light aerobic exercise, such as walking or stationary cycling (no resistance training)
  3. sports-specific exercise (for example, running in soccer, skating in hockey)
  4. non-contact training drills
  5. full contact training after medical clearance

–      http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/first_aid/concussions.html

concussion-brain-football-helmet.jpg

We can all help to reduce the number of concussions that occur during sports by encouraging safer practices. These would include things such as “enforcing rules to minimize player to player contact” as when: two soccer players competing for a header collide heads (http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org /“Heading Not the Main Safety Concern for Soccer Players“). The most recent ruling was the recent rule change of no headers at all in soccer for ages of 10 and younger. Also, several teams from pee wee to college have instituted non-tackle practices.  It is also important to make sure that safety equipment fits properly and is in good condition (http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/ “Get Your Head on Straight and Make Sure You Have a Properly Fitted Helmet”)).

And always remember       When in doubt, sit them out

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome

245810-adrenal-diagramThe Adrenal glands are to small glands that sit on top of the kidneys. Their functions are to provide hormones and to help regulate certain body functions such as:

  • Stress hormones
    • Cortisol: helps keep balance of many functions including blood sugar, metabolism, heart and blood vessel tone and central nervous system.
    • Adrenaline: quickly prepares the body for stressful situations.
  • Aldosterone: helps control blood pressure
  • Helps regulate inflammation.
  • Helps regulate the immune system.
  • Helps regulate our sleep/wake cycles

Like every organ in the body things can go wrong giving rise to a variety of diseases, some of which include Addisons disease (think President Kennedy, is adrenal insufficiency due to low cortisol and aldosterone), Cushing’s syndrome (the opposite of Addison’s, there is an overproduction of Cortisol), and Adrenal Cancer.

A more common issue with the Adrenal gland appears to be Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome. This occurs then the adrenals are constantly active due to the perception of constant stress. This over activation causes too much of the hormones to be secreted, unbalances the body’s normal functions and “burns out” the adrenals causing them to shut down.

The drastic swing from too much to too little hormones creates a feeling of high energy or stress followed by large let down and exhausted feeling.

Continue reading “Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome”

Fall Fun and Safe Leaf Raking

Leaf raking safety

Man raking leaves as they fall, shallow depth of field.

Once again the crunch of leaves on the ground and the cool breezes signal the arrival of autumn. But soon the beauty of the changing colors and smells of fall let way to the need of raking! If there are kids around, you will be faced with an increased amount of time spent gathering all the leaves into a wonderful pile for them to jump in. But with all of this raking comes the potential for injuries. So we ask you be mindful of how you rake and keep these simple tips to keep Fall fun.

  1. Warm-up and stretch for a few minutes before raking. (Back, Shoulder and wrist stretches)
  2. Use a rake that is the correct size for you and for your task.
  3. Wear gloves to avoid blisters.
  4. Do not twist, instead move at your hips and legs.
  5. Keep elbows close to your sides to prevent shoulder injuries.
  6. Do not throw leaves with the rake, instead pull them towards you.
  7. Avoid bending over to pick up leaves or bags of leaves, use proper lifting techniques (keep low back straight and bend at the hips.)
  8. Cool down stretch and ice if necessary when finished.

As with shoveling you should pace yourself, drink water and take breaks when needed.

If you experience shortness of breath or chest pain call 911.

leaf jumping

And for the kids, make sure you know what is in that pile of leaves before they jump in. Many times the leaves may be raked up to a rock or other object, and a forgotten rake left in the pile could end in a painful or dangerous jump.

“Core” muscle activation with a stable versus unstable base

http://www.anatomy-physiotherapy.com/31-systems/musculoskeletal/spine/1202-core-muscle-activation-with-a-stable-versus-unstable-base

Written by Eric Walper. Posted in Spine

Traditional approaches to core stability training utilize stable bases of support; however, little is known regarding the efficacy of unstable supports for core muscle activation. The authors of the current study sought to determine the surface electromyographic (sEMG) difference of torso musculature when comparing athletes under conditions of isometric bracing on a stable versus unstable surface. In general, it was shown that suspension based abdominal bracing noticeably improved anterior core muscles when compared to stable bracing however showed little different in lateral and posterior core musculature.

Eighteen “elite” level male athletes were recruited for inclusion in the study. Surface EMG was utilized to determine the rate of muscle contraction in the core stability muscles of the torso: rectus abdominus (RA), external obliques (EO), and erector spinae (ES).

The findings of the current study show clearly that there is a discrepancy between stable and unstable surface core activation. The use of an unstable surface such as a swiss ball or suspension system clearly demonstrated that anterior core musculature is more active then on a stable surface. Interestingly the authors noted that despite their predictions, unstable exercise failed to activate lateral and posterior musculature which could have implications for postural stabililty and training methodology. With the increase in popularity of suspension based training methods (such as TRX) this paper provides tangible validation as to the efficacy of these alternative training approaches.TRX

> From: Atkins et al., J Strength Cond Res 29 (2015) 1609-1615. All rights reserved to National Strength and Conditioning Association. 

The Sun: Our Skin’s Friend or Enemy

The sun is now starting to shine and people are shaking off the winter blues and heading outside. This time of year people are starting to exercise more, shed that “winter weight” and are looking to feel better. But why is it that we feel so much better in the summer? There are many obvious answers: fresh air, warm feels good, less clothes, more things to do. But there are more (or more scientific reasons) than that… ones we both can take greater advantage of (even during the winter) and reasons for warning.

sun-protection-for-skin

For years people have been told repeatedly for the need to use sun screen. They have been shown graphic pictures of melanoma skin cancer and warned of the possibility of death. There is a definite need in our current climate and lifestyle for the use of sun screen and covering up from the sun. Our society has for the majority become urban cave dwellers. As one time hunter/gather/growers we spent the majority of the time under the direct rays of the sun.  Over the years this increased the pigment in the skin and not only creates a nice tan but acts as a natural sun screen (the mild scientific backing of a “base tan” before a vacation although the best effect takes years and generations). This is why tribes in Africa do not need sunscreen. We now have been seeking the solace of indoors and are becoming a paler society. The majority of the population spends 5 days a week mostly inside during all sunlight hours at school or work, and when at home we stay inside and play video games, exercise either on a machine or a video game and “hunt” for our food inside a grocery store or restaurant.  This increases the risk of developing negative effects from the solar UV rays when we do get outside and thus increases the need for sunscreen and clothing cover ups.

One current area of concern today from inadequate sun exposure is Vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is naturally made in the body when UVB rays are absorbed in the skin. It is important because it helps calcium get into bones, decreases risks of cancer, autoimmune disease, and infections. It does not take a lot of UV rays to provide a daily dose, only 10-15 minutes of sun expose in a short sleeve shirt and shorts (during late spring and summer) is sufficient. The lighter the skin the less time needed and the darker the skin the less effective conversion. This is not a recommendation to lay out all day sun tanning or going to a tanning bed. However, making a conscious effort to be outside with moderate sun screen application is recommended

Vitamin D can also be supplemented. A good dose is 1000-1500 IU/d daily. This is important for people how either have medical or personal reasons for not getting any sun exposure or during the early spring late fall and winter who live above latitudes above 37 degrees north (above Texas…see map).

sun map

Vitamin D is not extremely common in foods but some common sources with good levels of Vit. D are listed in the table below.

Selected food sources of vitamin D
Food Vitamin D (IU*)
Salmon, 3.5 ounces 360
Mackerel, 3.5 ounces 345
Tuna, canned, 3.5 ounces 200
Orange juice, fortified, 8 ounces 100
Milk, fortified, 8 ounces 98
Breakfast cereals, fortified, 1 serving 40–100
*IU = international units
Source: Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health

The link between sunlight exposure and depression can be linked to a decrease in the neurotransmitter Serotonin. The winter blues, officially known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is characterized by a decrease in energy level, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, irritability, weight gain, and carbohydrate cravings, among other things. These symptoms are worsened by a decrease in fresh air and exercise that accompany the colder weather.

I am not recommending that we should all increase or risk of cancer and go with no protection to strengthen our natural defenses. However there is cause to question the American Academy of Dermatology recommends a No-Sun policy. At the least you should avoid prolonged exposure during the hottest time of mid day, wear SPF 15 or more and a hat.  Following those basic rules and getting out to enjoy the summer should leaving you feeling happy and healthy.

Dr. Dustin Sherman

REF:

http://www.aad.org/public/sun/smart.html

http://www.news-medical.net/news/2004/06/02/2139.aspx

http://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/update0604d.shtml

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/time-for-more-vitamin-d.htm

Holick, Michael F. Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis. Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston

Diehl JW, Chiu MW. Effects of ambient sunlight and photoprotection on vitamin D status. Dermatol Ther.2010 Jan;23(1):48-60.

Reichrath J. Skin cancer prevention and UV-protection: how to avoid vitamin D-deficiency? Br J Dermatol. 2009 Nov;161 Suppl 3:54-60.

Holick MF. Vitamin D and sunlight: strategies for cancer prevention and other health benefits. Clin J Am Soc   Nephrol. 2008 Sep;3(5):1548-54. Epub 2008 Jun 11